Breast is Best

Breastfeeding May Help Reduce the Risk of Alzeimer’s Disease
Although improved healthcare has contributed to longer healthier lives, along with aging comes an increasing risk of dementia. Although the exact cause of dementia remains unknown, new research has shown that Altzeimer’s disease is characterised by an insulin resistance in the brain. More recent research published in the Journal of Alzeimer’s Disease suggests that breastfeeding may help reduce the risk of contracting Alzeimer’s Disease
Breastfeeding and Alzheimer’s Disease
Researchers interviewed 81 British women between the ages of 70 and 100. Within the group of women, some had developed Alzheimer’s disease while some had not. Relatives, friends and caregivers of these women were also interviewed. The researchers collected data regarding the women’s reproductive history, breastfeeding history and dementia status. Other information, such as a history of stroke, brain tumor or head injury, that could have been related to their dementia status, were also obtained.
Dementia status was measured using a scale known as the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). In order to estimate the age of the participants at the onset of dementia, the researchers developed a method using the CDR and the known patterns of Alzheimer’s disease progression. This information was then compared to their history of breastfeeding.

Study Results
Although the sample size was small, the researchers were able to identify three trends in their research that remained after taking in other factors, such as current age, education history, age at birth of first child, age at menopause, as well as smoking and drinking history. The three trends showed:
-Women who breastfed their infants had a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease compared to women who did not breastfeed
-Women who breastfed for a longer period of time had a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease
-Women who had a higher ratio of total lifetime months pregnant to total months spent breastfeeding had a higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
Interestingly, the trends were not as strong for women that had a parent or sibling with dementia. The relationship between breastfeeding and Alzheimer’s disease was significantly lower for these women compared to women that had no family history of dementia.

Theories behind the Trends
Certain theories may help to explain the above trends. Firstly, breastfeeding deprives a woman’s body of progesterone, which helps to compensate for the high levels of progesterone that are produced during pregnancy. This is important because progesterone is known to desensitize the estrogen receptors in the brain. Estrogen is believed to play a protective role against Alzheimer’s disease. The second theory purports that breastfeeding increases glucose tolerance by restoring insulin sensitivity post-pregnancy. This is important because pregnancy results in a natural state of insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by insulin resistance in the brain. While the results of this research show a clear connection between breastfeeding and Alzheimer’s disease, further research needs to investigate the different biological processes that may be responsible for the connection.

The results of this study may help to point us in the right direction towards combating the global epidemic of Alzheimer’s disease. This is especially true for developing countries which are in need of low-cost and efficient methods to prevent Alzheimer’s disease. The results may help to further promote the benefits of breastfeeding which may help to persuade women that breastfeeding is a healthier option for new mothers.

Other Known Health Benefits of Breastfeeding
Numerous studies have found varieties of health benefits associated with breastfeeding. Although human milk is important for babies, the process of making milk is also good for mothers, helping protect them from cancers and weak bones later in life. Breastfeeding not only helps mothers bond with their babies and remain calmer under stress, babies who are only bottle fed have more change of speech problems, lower lung capacity, more need for braces than those who feed at the breast. New research now also shows a baby’s saliva enters the breast and helps the mother meet the baby’s needs for immune protection. (If you are exclusively pumping, letting your baby lick or mouth your nipple every day may help this communication happen).

Breastfeeding Duration and Receptive Language at age 3 and Intelligence at age 7
Breastfeeding duration is associated with receptive language at age 3 and intelligence at age 7, according to a study published online July 29 in JAMA Pediatrics. Mandy B. Belfort, MD, MPH, from Boston Children’s Hospital, and colleagues examined the correlations between breastfeeding duration and exclusivity and child cognition at ages 3 and 7, and assessed whether maternal fish consumption modifies these associations. Data were collected from 1,312 mothers and children from a prospective cohort study that enrolled mothers from April 1999 through July 2002 and followed the children to age 7. The researchers found that longer breastfeeding duration correlated with higher Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test score at age 3 years and with higher intelligence on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test at age 7 years, after adjustment for sociodemographics, maternal intelligence, and home environment. There was no correlation between breastfeeding duration and Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning scores. Greater beneficial effects of breastfeeding were noted on the Wide Range Assessment of Visual Motor Abilities at age 3 years for women who consumed two or more servings of fish per week versus less than two servings. “In summary our results support a causal relationship of breastfeeding in infancy with receptive language at age 3 and with verbal and nonverbal IQ at school age,” the authors write. “These findings support national and international recommendations to promote exclusive breastfeeding through age 6 months and continuation of breastfeeding through at least age 1 year.”

To see more http://www.hcplive.com/articles/Breastfeeding-Duration-Linked-to-Child-Intelligence#sthash.gqsFu5Dh.dpuf

Breastfeeding and Childhood Obesity
Breastfeeding can halve the risk of children being obese by the age of eight, so says a study from Japan. Researchers in Japan studied 43,000 infants from 2001. They were weighed at the ages of 7 and 8 using body mass index (BMI) guidelines and factors such as exercise and whether mothers smoked were also considered. Some 20 per cent of these children had been breastfed exclusively for six months. At the age of seven it was found, those children breastfed were 15 per cent less likely to be overweight and 45 per cent less at risk of obesity than those children who were ‘formula fed’. By the age of eight reduced obesity risk was even greater at 55 per cent. Dr Michiyo Yamakawa who led this study, published in Jama Pediatrics, claims the results of this research show “it would be better to support breastfeeding even in developed countries”.

peter

PETER WALKER specialises in supporting parent and child relationships and the well-being and fitness of mothers and babies, especially those babies and children with developmental delay from conception to to seven. His certificated Teacher Training Courses in Developmental Baby Massage for professionals working with mothers and babies are given throughout the UK and internationally. These courses attract midwives, health visitors, neonatal nurses and other therapists from all around the world. A pioneer of Developmental Baby Massage and YogaGym for babies and children from the 1980s onwards. Peter is credited as the original NHS baby massage teacher trainer who’s teacher training resulted in baby massage being offered free to parents in health centres and clinics throughout the United Kingdom. The leading international trainer for Developmental Baby Massage with over 35 years of group teaching experience Peter currently has over 14,000 teachers or more in over 20 different countries all taught and certificated by him teaching Developmental Baby Massage. Background Peter has studied yoga and experiential anatomy from the early ‘80’s. He worked with a group practicing ‘Psycho- Gymnastics’ and ‘Re- Birthing’ for some ten years under the supervision of R.D. Laing psychiatrist musician, and author and a founder of the Philadelphia Association in London. Peter introduced yoga and massage into a number of Dr. Laing’s therapeutic communities and from the mid-eighties onwards has given Childbirth Support and taught Developmental Baby Massage and Soft Post-Natal Yoga to mothers and babies with some unique techniques for parents with babies with developmental delay. Peter has made numerous television appearances and has featured in documentaries and breakfast shows on all the UK’s major channels. He has also given talks on BBC Radio One, Woman’s Radio, Radio Wales and other radio stations and has been featured in articles in Woman, Cosmopolitan, Harpers & Queen, The Telegraph, Daily Mail, The Guardian, The Observer, The Times, Japan Times and Australia’s Natural Parenting magazine and many other national publications including most UK ‘mother and baby’ periodicals. His numerous books, sold in 18 different languages, include: Baby Gymnastics (Unwin) Baby Relax (Unwin) Going for Gold [with DaleyThompson] (Unwin) Natural Parenting (Gaia) The Book of Massage (Gaia) Baby Massage (Piatkus) Hop, Skip and Jump [Gymnastics for Children] (Carroll and Brown) Developmental Baby Massage (Carroll and Brown, 3rd reprint, October 2010, special edition) Sharing Pregnancy E Book 2012 Peter has also made the following films: Baby Massage Step 1 2 and 3 (Little Venice Films) Massage and Movement: Birth to Three Years Sharing Pregnancy [A Unique Film for Fathers] DVD Developmental Baby Massage, DVD Soft Baby Yoga, DVD YogaGym, DVD Stretching Together, DVD Peter works worldwide throughout the United Kingdom and abroad. For more detailed information about his teacher training course See www.babymassageteachertraining.com Email: walker@thebabieswebsite.com

One thought on “Breast is Best

  1. Hi there, You’ve done an incredible job. I will definitely digg it and
    personally recommend to my friends. I am confident they’ll be
    benefited from this website.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


× three = 12

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Tag Cloud

Meta